Study: Sugary drinks and diet drinks linked to higher risk of death

A recent study has linked drinking two or more sugary drinks today to a significantly higher risk of death

A new study published in the journal Circulation shows that the consumption of sugar sweetened beverages and artificially sweetened beverages is linked to a higher risk of death.[1]

This study, which reviewed the history of over 117,000 participants, found that women who drank two or more sugary drinks per day had a 63% increased risk of premature death.

Men who drank similar amounts had a 29% increased risk of death.

The study found an increase in Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) and to a lesser degree an increased risk of cancer.

The formal conclusion of the study is :

Consumption of SSBs (Sugar Sweetened Beverages) was positively associated with mortality primarily through CVD mortality and showed a graded association with dose. The positive association between high intake levels of ASBs (Artificially Sweetened Beverages) and total and CVD mortality observed among women requires further confirmation.

The “graded association with dose” part is important.

It means the more you drink, the increased risk of negative health impacts.

Each additional serving per day was associated with a 7% higher risk of death.

A typical 12-oz serving of soda contains 140 to 150 calories and more than 35 g of sugar.

Those who drank more of these in the study showed greater incidence of weight gain, hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.

The researchers conclude that limiting the intake of sugary drinks makes sense and that high intake of artificially sweetened drinks should be avoided as well.

They further recommend that water be promoted as a healthier alternative.

In Summary

This study is another compelling piece of evidence to support our recommendation – water is the best beverage.

For readers looking to improve their health and fitness – drink water, tea, or coffee rather than sugary drinks.

Avoid diet sodas as well – while they may container fewer (or zero) calories they still have a negative impact on your health.

References

1. Long-Term Consumption of Sugar-Sweetened and Artificially Sweetened Beverages and Risk of Mortality in US Adults Vasanti S. Malik , Yanping Li , An Pan , Lawrence De Koning , Eva Schernhammer , Walter C. Willett , and Frank B. Hu.

Water - the best beverage for health and fitness

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