Exercising early in the morning appears to lead to more weight loss as compared to exercising late in the day.
Aging & Health

Is the Morning the Best Time to Exercise for Weight Loss?

A new study published in the International Journal of Obesity seems to show that those who exercise in the morning lose more weight than those who exercise after 3pm.[1] The researchers involved in this study wanted to evaluate the impact of exercise timing on weight loss, as well as energy balance. The study involved many participants who completed a 10-month supervised exercise program. The participants were split up into multiple groups – with some working out early, and others later in the day. At the end, those who exercised before noon had lost significantly more weight, as compared to those that exercised later in the day. The researchers official conclusion was: “This study, combined with the results of previous studies, [Read more …]

Does weight training have healthy effects on the human brain - as it seems to do for lab mice?
Aging & Health

Weight Training – Good for the Brain Too?

A new study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology seems to show that weight training has beneficial effects on the brain (in lab mice.)[1] Resistance exercise training (also called strength training, or weight training) is believed to have beneficial effects on the cognitive impairment that can precede neuroinflammatory disease. But, what has not been discovered is why weight training helps. This study attempted to do just that. Lab rats with an artificially induced form of cognition impairment were monitored after having performed resistance training exercise. How do you make a rat do weight training? The researchers had the rats perform ladder climbs (for treats) with additional weight resistance. The rats gained muscle mass and strength – but that was [Read more …]

Can too much sitting make you resistant to the positive effects of exercise? It seems yes.
Aging & Health

Study: Too much sitting makes you resistant to the effects of exercise

A new study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology seems to show that people can become “resistant” to the healthy benefits of aerobic exercise if they sit too much.[1] In this study, a number of participants were asked to perform aerobic exercise after 4 days of prolonged sitting. The metabolic impacts of that exercise (post-exercise triglycerides, glucose, and insulin levels) were then compared to exercise sessions done on days which included a 1 hour treadmill workout. The participants did not see as much benefit from exercise after the bouts of prolonged sitting. The researchers call this condition “Exercise Resistance”. What does this all mean? It is probably wise to partake in physical activity (whether exercise, or otherwise) frequently – [Read more …]

A recent study has linked drinking two or more sugary drinks today to a significantly higher risk of death
Aging & Health

Study: Sugary drinks and diet drinks linked to higher risk of death

A new study published in the journal Circulation shows that the consumption of sugar sweetened beverages and artificially sweetened beverages is linked to a higher risk of death.[1] This study, which reviewed the history of over 117,000 participants, found that women who drank two or more sugary drinks per day had a 63% increased risk of premature death. Men who drank similar amounts had a 29% increased risk of death. The study found an increase in Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) and to a lesser degree an increased risk of cancer. The formal conclusion of the study is : Consumption of SSBs (Sugar Sweetened Beverages) was positively associated with mortality primarily through CVD mortality and showed a graded association with dose. The [Read more …]

Woman sleeping - timely sleep may be an essential part of maintaining a healthy weight.
Aging & Health

Can you “catch up” on sleep?

Can you use the weekends to “catch up” on missed sleep? A new study published in the journal Current Biology seems to indicate that you can’t.[1] In this study, a number of participants were split up into three groups. Two groups slept only 5 hours per weeknight, and the other slept 9 hours per night. One group that slept less during the week were allowed to sleep as much as they wanted on the weekend – to “catch up”. This didn’t prevent that group from gaining weight – due to metabolic dysregulation from the lost sleep. The researchers concluded that: “Weekend recovery sleep did not prevent weight gain or reduced insulin sensitivity” Insulin sensitivity is an important factor in maintaining [Read more …]

Exercise at the gym - biking
Aging & Health

Research: Intense Exercise Helps Your Body Clean Up “Junk Proteins”

Exercise has a lot of benefits such as: helping you maintain a healthy weight, improving your mental state, building strong muscles and tendons, and more. The latest research shows another potential benefit. It seems that intense exercise can help accelerate the body’s internal processes for cleaning up misfolded proteins – also known as “junk proteins”.[1] Every cell within your body is made from proteins, and there is a complete protein lifecycle that is used by the body to manage the creation and elimination of these proteins. This essential function is known as proteostatis. It includes protein synthesis, folding, assembly, translocation, and clearance.[2] Environmental and physiological stress can cause cellular dysfunction – and this can result in the creation defective proteins. [Read more …]

A map showing projected life expectancy by nation in the year 2040. The US life expectancy is projected to improve minimally between 2016 and 2040.
Aging & Health

Study Predicts Minimal Life Expectancy Improvements for US

A new study published in the medical journal The Lancet shows that US life expectancies will improve minimally between now and the year 2040.[1] The average life expectancy of a citizen of the US was 78.7 years in the year 2016. In the year 2040, the average life span is expected to be only 79.8 years, for a meager 1.1 year increase. This improvement is especially small compared to other Western nations. In contrast, life expectancy improvements globally will average a gain of 4.4 years in the same time frame. The study used a forecasting model to predict the life expectancy improvements, and makes assumptions about the health risk factors that will impact lifespan in the year 2040. For example, [Read more …]

Treadmill in a gym - running on the treadmill is one way to improve physical fitness in the gym or at home.
Aging & Health

Aerobic Fitness Shows Significant Benefits For Health

A new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association shows that people with the highest levels of aerobic fitness have the least chance of death.[1] The study shows that lacking aerobic fitness is greater than or equal to traditional health risk factors such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and smoking. In the study over 120,000 participants were tested for cardiorespiratory (aerobic) fitness on a treadmill. This is a significant improvement over other studies that have used self-reported exercise activity. The bottom line that the participants who performed highest on the treadmill test, tended to have the least chance of death. Another significant finding is that it seems there is no upper-limit on the benefits of fitness – even [Read more …]

State variation in meeting the 2008 federal guidelines for both aerobic and muscle-strengthening activities through leisure-time physical activity among adults aged 18–64: United States 2010–2015
Aging & Health

Study: Most Adults Don’t Get Enough Exercise

In a recent US government study it was found that less than 23% of U.S. adults aged 18–64 met guidelines for both aerobic and muscle-strengthening activities. [1] These findings are of concern because regular participation in physical activity lowers the risk of many chronic conditions, disability, and mortality. What are these guideline recommendations? Specifically, adults should perform at least 150 minutes per week of moderate physical activity, or 75 minutes per week of vigorous physical activity, in addition to muscle-strengthening activities 2 or more days per week. [2] The study was conducted over a number of years, and found variations including differences between states, age groups, and sex. Men were more likely to meet the activity requirements. The national average [Read more …]

A microscopic view of a virus - does exercise negatively impact immune system function?
Aging & Health

How Does Exercise Impact Your Immune System?

How does vigorous exercise impact your immune system? In the past, it was believed that intense exercise will make you more susceptible to illness. But the results of a recent study seem to suggest the opposite. Published in the Frontiers in Immunology journal recently, this study hints that intense exercise in fact does not blunt the immune system’s effectiveness. Rather, it may improve immune system performance, and in any case does not appear to make your immune system less effective. This meta-analysis, which is a study of the results of numerous other studies, cannot prove this conjecture, but it does highlight strong evidence that appears to confirm the hypothesis. The authors take a fresh look at the measurable immune system [Read more …]