Men with more muscle mass as they enter middle age tend to fare better against heart disease.
Aging & Health

Research Study: Higher Muscle Mass Linked to Lower Heart Disease Risk

Do you have cardiovascular disease as part of your family history? Do you want to prevent heart disease, which is known as one of the most common mortality factors? A new research study[1] shows that the more muscle mass a person has upon entering middle age, the lower their risk of cardiovascular disease as they grow older. What was the Goal of the Research Study? An international group of researchers published their paper in the January issue of the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health with the goal of assessing the relationship between skeletal muscle mass and cardiovascular disease incidence over a 10-year span of time. The study was conducted on adults who were 45 years and older and were [Read more …]

Many fitness trackers incorporate a heart rate monitor - this is a great way to utilize heart rate training
Aging & Health

Research Study: Add Up To 10 Years of Lifespan with Healthy Habits

You may wonder if those lifestyle choices you make today will really make any difference on how you age or how long you will live. Can you truly decrease your risk of chronic diseases or is it already pre-determined? The results of a new research study[1] published in the BMJ may help you make up your mind. What did the research study attempt to prove? The objective of the research study was to determine the relationship between certain low-risk lifestyle factors and life expectancy with and without certain chronic diseases. The study set out to prove that by adopting particular healthy habits, you could not only add years to your life, but you could live those additional years free of [Read more …]

If you are wanting to lose weight, maintain your weight or simply want to improve your overall health, you might want to try intermittent fasting. This approach to eating uses an intermittent schedule so that you might enjoy several research-backed health benefits. There are several different types of IF, allowing you to choose the method that fits you and your lifestyle the best.
Aging & Health

Research Study: Intermittent Fasting and Aging

The new year is settling in, which means most people are heading to pack the gym as they take on their New Year’s resolution of getting fit and practicing regular exercise. With all the new fads and methods popping up year after year about how to get trim and toned, it can be hard to determine what is best for you and your lifestyle, let alone which of these fads and methods actually work. One of the most popular methods out there today is intermittent fasting, and today we’re going to dive into the actual research study[1] conducted on this method to test its effectiveness, practicality, and overall results. What Did the Research Study Attempt to Prove? Intermittent fasting is [Read more …]

A group of fitness enthusiasts taking a selfie in the gym
Aging & Health

5 Tips To Achieve Your New Year’s Resolution

So here we go again, it’s almost New Year’s and for many of us that means New Year’s resolutions. Are you planning on getting into shape as a New Year’s resolution? Is weight loss one of your New Year’s goals? Well if you are like most Americans chances are that exercise, and fitness are going to be one of your New Year’s resolutions. However, what are a few ways that you can make this New Year’s resolutions goals easier than years past? Can You Reach Your New Year’s Resolution? This Is How! Tip #1: Have a Plan Like with any goal, before you act it is important to outline a plan. For instance, if weight loss is your plan how [Read more …]

The technique of breaking up exercise into short "snacks" instead of long workouts is known as Exercise snacks. It has been shown to lead to measurable increases in cardio fitness - even when done infrequently.
Aging & Health

Research Study: Can Marathon Running Improve Knee Health in Adults?

Is long distance running good for your knees, or bad for your knees? A recent research study[1] posted in the BMJ Open found some surprising results. The general thoughts on running and knee health, especially for older adults tends to go back and forth with some studies saying that repetitive movements are too jarring and cause too much impact to knees, ankles and other joints while other studies have concluded that the damage is minimal and that running can be safe if done correctly. In this long term, cohort study researchers attempted to prove that longer term running (i.e. marathon running) did not cause excessive damage to the knees and that it could, in fact, improve knee health. What is [Read more …]

Exercise seems to help depression
Aging & Health

Can Exercise and Physical Activity Help Prevent Depression?

Approaching the conundrum of whether depression leads to inactivity or if inactivity causes depression, the facts speak for themselves: Exercise is beneficial to both psychological and physical health[1]. The effects of being physically active both prevent and improve a number of health conditions including lowering blood pressure, reducing the risk of heart disease and diabetes, alleviating the symptoms of arthritis, reducing anxiety and improving mood. The Research Backs This Up The statistics show us that one in ten adults in the U.S. is dealing with the effects of depression and likely to be on antidepressant medications[2]. While more research is necessary to identify all the contributing factors that either cause or alleviate the effects of depression, studies have shown that [Read more …]

Young woman working out with an air bike.
Aging & Health

Study: Aerobic Fitness Shows Reduced Cardiometabolic Risk vs Strength Training

A new study published in the JAMA Open seems to show that those who possess greater aerobic fitness have less cardiometabolic risk as opposed to those who prioritize strength training.[1] The researchers involved in this study wanted to evaluate whether the metabolites associated with cardiometabolic risk were equally associated with both aerobic fitness and maximal muscular strength. The study involved many participants who were part of a military training exercise. The participants were split up into multiple groups – those with maximal aerobic fitness, those with minimal aerobic fitness, those with maximal strength (as demonstrated on the leg extension), and those with minimal strength. The researchers used metabolomics to study the metabolites present in the trainees blood stream. Metabolomics is [Read more …]

Exercising early in the morning appears to lead to more weight loss as compared to exercising late in the day.
Aging & Health

Is the Morning the Best Time to Exercise for Weight Loss?

A new study published in the International Journal of Obesity seems to show that those who exercise in the morning lose more weight than those who exercise after 3pm.[1] The researchers involved in this study wanted to evaluate the impact of exercise timing on weight loss, as well as energy balance. The study involved many participants who completed a 10-month supervised exercise program. The participants were split up into multiple groups – with some working out early, and others later in the day. At the end, those who exercised before noon had lost significantly more weight, as compared to those that exercised later in the day. The researchers official conclusion was: “This study, combined with the results of previous studies, [Read more …]

Does weight training have healthy effects on the human brain - as it seems to do for lab mice?
Aging & Health

Weight Training – Good for the Brain Too?

A new study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology seems to show that weight training has beneficial effects on the brain (in lab mice.)[1] Resistance exercise training (also called strength training, or weight training) is believed to have beneficial effects on the cognitive impairment that can precede neuroinflammatory disease. But, what has not been discovered is why weight training helps. This study attempted to do just that. Lab rats with an artificially induced form of cognition impairment were monitored after having performed resistance training exercise. How do you make a rat do weight training? The researchers had the rats perform ladder climbs (for treats) with additional weight resistance. The rats gained muscle mass and strength – but that was [Read more …]

Can too much sitting make you resistant to the positive effects of exercise? It seems yes.
Aging & Health

Study: Too much sitting makes you resistant to the effects of exercise

A new study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology seems to show that people can become “resistant” to the healthy benefits of aerobic exercise if they sit too much.[1] In this study, a number of participants were asked to perform aerobic exercise after 4 days of prolonged sitting. The metabolic impacts of that exercise (post-exercise triglycerides, glucose, and insulin levels) were then compared to exercise sessions done on days which included a 1 hour treadmill workout. The participants did not see as much benefit from exercise after the bouts of prolonged sitting. The researchers call this condition “Exercise Resistance”. What does this all mean? It is probably wise to partake in physical activity (whether exercise, or otherwise) frequently – [Read more …]