Body-weight exercises include lunges, and more
Aging & Health

Research Study: 11 Minutes of Bodyweight Exercise Can Improve Cardio Fitness

A new research study[1] shows that as little as eleven minutes of burpees, jump squats, and other exercises can improve aerobic fitness, according to one of the first randomized, controlled trials to test the effects of brief body-weight workouts. What was the Goal of the Research Study? Few experiments studied the effects of short body-weight workouts on endurance and strength, and those few had shortcomings. They concentrated on people who were already fit, and none met the scientific gold standard of being randomized and being an inactive control group. Therefore, researchers’ confidence in short body-weight training benefits may have been expected, but there was no proof. What were the Research Methods of the Study? Researchers from the McMaster University community [Read more …]

woman preparing to exercise
Aging & Health

Cardio Fitness – The More, The Better

A new research study[1] shows that higher physical activity is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. Being physically active is beneficial for you, especially in preventing diseases like heart attacks and strokes. According to the new study headed by the University of Oxford, indulging yourself in regular physical exercise or getting more activity may even be more profitable for the prevention of cardiovascular disease. But, it also showed that the people with the highest level of activity reaped the greatest benefits. More is better. What was the Goal of the Research Study? The study’s goal was to prove that higher levels of physical activity can lower the risk of cardiovascular disease. There was skepticism about the previous methods [Read more …]

Watching waistline
Aging & Health

U.S. Dietary Guidance for Sugar and Alcohol Intake Remains Unchanged

Every 5 years the US government releases revised dietary guidelines for optimal health and longevity. The newest recommendations[1] have left unchanged the amount of added sugar and alcohol consumption that is recommended on a daily basis – despite the input to the contrary of the scientific advisory council. This is puzzling because prior studies show that lowering sugar and alcohol consumption reduces the risk of an individual getting diet-related chronic diseases such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes. What is the Goal of the Nutrition Guidelines? The goal of these nutrition guidelines is to encourage Americans to live a healthier lifestyle. It aims to educate Americans to follow a healthier dietary pattern. It should also help maintain good [Read more …]

Food you might eat when you are done intermittent fasting
Aging & Health

Research Study: Is Diet Associated with Long-Term Cognitive Trajectories?

A new research study[1] presents that particular dietary regimens may impact rates of mental deterioration. It appears that the foods we eat have a direct influence on our cognitive acuity in our later years. It is uncertain how long-term food consumption affects Fluid Intelligence among adults with or without a genetic history of Alzheimer’s Disease. Still, greater age-related Fluid Intelligence deterioration escalates the possibility of Alzheimer’s disease. What was the Goal of the Research Study? The study aims to monitor how the total diet is linked with long-term cognition among mid-to-late-life populations at-risk and not-at-risk for Alzheimer’s Disease. What were the Research Methods of the Study? Among 1,787 mid-to-late-aged adult UK Biobank participants, 10-year Fluid Intelligence trajectories were designed and [Read more …]

Can we couter the effect of sitting with exercise? Yes
Aging & Health

Research Study: Counter the Effects of Sitting with 11 Minutes of Exercise a Day?

A new research study[1] shows that a mere 11 minutes a day of exercise could decrease the unwanted health consequences of sitting for several hours. Low levels of physical activity and high amounts of sedentary time are associated with higher morbidity and mortality risks. In contrast, other large-scale meta-analyses and cohort studies examining the joint associations between physical activity and sedentary behaviors suggest that high levels of physical activity attenuate or even eliminate the associations between sitting time all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality. What was the Goal of the Research Study? Some older studies in 2016 suggested that if you do about 30 minutes of exercise most days but sit for eight hours at work a day, it is still [Read more …]

Men with more muscle mass as they enter middle age tend to fare better against heart disease.
Aging & Health

Research Study: Higher Muscle Mass Linked to Lower Heart Disease Risk

Do you have cardiovascular disease as part of your family history? Do you want to prevent heart disease, which is known as one of the most common mortality factors? A new research study[1] shows that the more muscle mass a person has upon entering middle age, the lower their risk of cardiovascular disease as they grow older. What was the Goal of the Research Study? An international group of researchers published their paper in the January issue of the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health with the goal of assessing the relationship between skeletal muscle mass and cardiovascular disease incidence over a 10-year span of time. The study was conducted on adults who were 45 years and older and were [Read more …]

Many fitness trackers incorporate a heart rate monitor - this is a great way to utilize heart rate training
Aging & Health

Research Study: Add Up To 10 Years of Lifespan with Healthy Habits

You may wonder if those lifestyle choices you make today will really make any difference on how you age or how long you will live. Can you truly decrease your risk of chronic diseases or is it already pre-determined? The results of a new research study[1] published in the BMJ may help you make up your mind. What did the research study attempt to prove? The objective of the research study was to determine the relationship between certain low-risk lifestyle factors and life expectancy with and without certain chronic diseases. The study set out to prove that by adopting particular healthy habits, you could not only add years to your life, but you could live those additional years free of [Read more …]

The technique of breaking up exercise into short "snacks" instead of long workouts is known as Exercise snacks. It has been shown to lead to measurable increases in cardio fitness - even when done infrequently.
Aging & Health

Research Study: Can Marathon Running Improve Knee Health in Adults?

Is long distance running good for your knees, or bad for your knees? A recent research study[1] posted in the BMJ Open found some surprising results. The general thoughts on running and knee health, especially for older adults tends to go back and forth with some studies saying that repetitive movements are too jarring and cause too much impact to knees, ankles and other joints while other studies have concluded that the damage is minimal and that running can be safe if done correctly. In this long term, cohort study researchers attempted to prove that longer term running (i.e. marathon running) did not cause excessive damage to the knees and that it could, in fact, improve knee health. What is [Read more …]

Young woman working out with an air bike.
Aging & Health

Study: Aerobic Fitness Shows Reduced Cardiometabolic Risk vs Strength Training

A new study published in the JAMA Open seems to show that those who possess greater aerobic fitness have less cardiometabolic risk as opposed to those who prioritize strength training.[1] The researchers involved in this study wanted to evaluate whether the metabolites associated with cardiometabolic risk were equally associated with both aerobic fitness and maximal muscular strength. The study involved many participants who were part of a military training exercise. The participants were split up into multiple groups – those with maximal aerobic fitness, those with minimal aerobic fitness, those with maximal strength (as demonstrated on the leg extension), and those with minimal strength. The researchers used metabolomics to study the metabolites present in the trainees blood stream. Metabolomics is [Read more …]

Exercising early in the morning appears to lead to more weight loss as compared to exercising late in the day.
Aging & Health

Is the Morning the Best Time to Exercise for Weight Loss?

A new study published in the International Journal of Obesity seems to show that those who exercise in the morning lose more weight than those who exercise after 3pm.[1] The researchers involved in this study wanted to evaluate the impact of exercise timing on weight loss, as well as energy balance. The study involved many participants who completed a 10-month supervised exercise program. The participants were split up into multiple groups – with some working out early, and others later in the day. At the end, those who exercised before noon had lost significantly more weight, as compared to those that exercised later in the day. The researchers official conclusion was: “This study, combined with the results of previous studies, [Read more …]