Does weight training have healthy effects on the human brain - as it seems to do for lab mice?
Aging & Health

Weight Training – Good for the Brain Too?

A new study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology seems to show that weight training has beneficial effects on the brain (in lab mice.)[1] Resistance exercise training (also called strength training, or weight training) is believed to have beneficial effects on the cognitive impairment that can precede neuroinflammatory disease. But, what has not been discovered is why weight training helps. This study attempted to do just that. Lab rats with an artificially induced form of cognition impairment were monitored after having performed resistance training exercise. How do you make a rat do weight training? The researchers had the rats perform ladder climbs (for treats) with additional weight resistance. The rats gained muscle mass and strength – but that was [Read more …]

A recent study has linked drinking two or more sugary drinks today to a significantly higher risk of death
Aging & Health

Study: Sugary drinks and diet drinks linked to higher risk of death

A new study published in the journal Circulation shows that the consumption of sugar sweetened beverages and artificially sweetened beverages is linked to a higher risk of death.[1] This study, which reviewed the history of over 117,000 participants, found that women who drank two or more sugary drinks per day had a 63% increased risk of premature death. Men who drank similar amounts had a 29% increased risk of death. The study found an increase in Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) and to a lesser degree an increased risk of cancer. The formal conclusion of the study is : Consumption of SSBs (Sugar Sweetened Beverages) was positively associated with mortality primarily through CVD mortality and showed a graded association with dose. The [Read more …]

Woman sleeping - timely sleep may be an essential part of maintaining a healthy weight.
Aging & Health

Can you “catch up” on sleep?

Can you use the weekends to “catch up” on missed sleep? A new study published in the journal Current Biology seems to indicate that you can’t.[1] In this study, a number of participants were split up into three groups. Two groups slept only 5 hours per weeknight, and the other slept 9 hours per night. One group that slept less during the week were allowed to sleep as much as they wanted on the weekend – to “catch up”. This didn’t prevent that group from gaining weight – due to metabolic dysregulation from the lost sleep. The researchers concluded that: “Weekend recovery sleep did not prevent weight gain or reduced insulin sensitivity” Insulin sensitivity is an important factor in maintaining [Read more …]

Exercise at the gym - biking
Aging & Health

Research: Intense Exercise Helps Your Body Clean Up “Junk Proteins”

Exercise has a lot of benefits such as: helping you maintain a healthy weight, improving your mental state, building strong muscles and tendons, and more. The latest research shows another potential benefit. It seems that intense exercise can help accelerate the body’s internal processes for cleaning up misfolded proteins – also known as “junk proteins”.[1] Every cell within your body is made from proteins, and there is a complete protein lifecycle that is used by the body to manage the creation and elimination of these proteins. This essential function is known as proteostatis. It includes protein synthesis, folding, assembly, translocation, and clearance.[2] Environmental and physiological stress can cause cellular dysfunction – and this can result in the creation defective proteins. [Read more …]

The technique of breaking up exercise into short "snacks" instead of long workouts is known as Exercise snacks. It has been shown to lead to measurable increases in cardio fitness - even when done infrequently.
Exercise

Use “Exercise Snacks” To Improve Your Cardio Fitness

A new study published in the journal Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism shows that cardio fitness can be improved measurably with surprisingly little activity. The study showed that climbing 3 flights of stairs, 3 times per day, with several hours of rest in between resulted in measurable improvements in cardio fitness.[1] The concept of breaking up exercise into short, manageable chunks results in what are known as “Exercise Snacks”. By breaking up fitness into short, infrequent bouts you can more easily incorporate exercise into your daily routine. The study used 24 young adults with sedentary lifestyles and a control group of peers. The group that vigorously climbed 3 flights of stairs 3 times per day, with 1-4 hours of rest [Read more …]